SAIPAN — Dr. John Doyle has asked the federal court to rule in his favor and dismiss with prejudice the U.S. government's allegation that he dispensed opioids and controlled substances 73 times.

In its lawsuit, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Districts of Guam and the NMI also wants Doyle to pay civil penalties in the total amount of $4,936,771.

Doyle, who is represented by attorney Steven Pixley, demanded a jury trial.

The complaint alleged that Doyle issued multiple prescriptions for high quantities of a dangerous combination of drugs – opioids, benzodiazepines and muscle relaxants – as well as other controlled substances to the spouse of a colleague, frequently, without examining the patient.

He also allegedly issued other controlled substances to another patient, "ignoring obvious signs of addiction and physical mental deterioration."

The complaint stated that the Drug Enforcement Agency reviewed select patient files of Doyle from 2015 to 2020, and conducted an investigation of his controlled substances prescribing activities from October 2016 to January 2020.

The DEA also reviewed patient files from Marianas Medical Center and the Commonwealth Health Center for two patients; prescription logs at Pacific Health Inc. and Brabu Pharmacies; as well as a patient's medical and prescription records from San Diego, California, where the patient traveled to and from frequently.

In addition, the DEA conducted two interviews with Doyle on Jan. 7 and 9, 2020.

But Pixley said Doyle was not provided with a transcript of the interview.

"He was provided with a summary of the interview which he submits does not accurately reflect his statements during the interview," the lawyer said.

The lawyer said Doyle knew that one of his patients "was having mental difficulties (so) he took action to obtain psychiatric treatment for (the) patient ... subject to the limited mental health resources available in the Northern Mariana Islands."

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