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Here is what the editors at Physician's Briefing chose as the most important COVID-19 developments for you and your practice for the week of Jan. 10 to 14, 2022. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal studies and other trusted sources that is most likely to affect clinical practice.

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The nomination of former U.S. Food and Drug Administration head Robert Califf, M.D., to again lead the agency now heads to the full Senate for a vote, after a Senate committee on Thursday voted 13-8 for approval.

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor baricitinib is strongly recommended for patients with severe or critical COVID-19, and sotrovimab is conditionally recommended for nonsevere COVID-19, according to the updated World Health Organization living guideline on drugs for COVID-19, published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Full COVID-19 vaccination, including third doses and/or boosters, is recommended for all patients with cancer, with a strong preference for mRNA vaccines, according to expert consensus recommendations published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN).

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early Parkinson disease (PD), average regular overall physical activity levels over time are associated with slower deterioration of postural and gait stability, activities of daily living, and processing speed, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Neurology.

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers should make individual decisions whether to prescribe aspirin based on a benefit-to-risk ratio, not simply age, according to a review published online Dec. 24 in Family Medicine and Community Health.

editor's pick

A woman accused of dealing more than 50 grams of methamphetamine admitted to one of the charges filed against her in the District Court of Guam.

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FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- For years, researchers have suspected that the Epstein-Barr virus, best known for causing mononucleois, might also play a role in triggering multiple sclerosis. Now a new study strengthens the case.